Grades have been entered

Not happy with your grades?

Remember: Lecturers do not GIVE grades. Students EARN grades.

Before complaining about your grade, you have to accept responsibility for that grade and the amount of effort you put into the course and the final assessment.

Before asking your lecturer for a higher grade, think about how the lecturer calculated your grade. Even one piece of missing work can result in a lower grade. The lecturer has a marking scheme when they mark the final exams, they are looking for certain items to be on the paper before giving marks. You don’t get lots of marks simply because you wrote a lot. Being unhappy with your grade is not a legitimate reason for asking for a grade change. Needing a higher CGPA is not a reason for badgering individual lecturers for higher grades. Just because you submitted an assignment doesn’t mean you will get full marks for it. Submitting work late can also mean a reduction in marks. Lecturers can only mark what is in front of them. They can’t give you marks just because they like you.

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Final exam

Rooms are open if yòu wish to take your seat. Please go to correct room. Good luck!

FINAL EXAM SPRING 2019

As announced previously, your final exam is

at 17:00 hrs (5pm)

on 21 May 2019

in 0-D01 and 1-D01.

Here is the seating plan

II-0-D01

Civil Engineering

Marketing

International Business

Tourism

Innovation and Knowledge Mgt

MBA – 2017 registered

 

II-1-D01

MBA -2018 registered

 

 

WARNING:

Do not go to the wrong exam room.
The attendance sheet for your department

is only in ONE ROOM

so it is very important to go to the correct room

More feedback

Not happy with your grades?

Remember: Lecturers do not GIVE grades. Students EARN grades.

Before complaining about your grade on the mid term exam, you have to accept responsibility for that grade and the amount of effort you put into the exam.

For strategic management, this blog has MANY resources. There are sample case studies and sample exam questions that you could have practiced with.

As well as a pdf copy of the book, there are videos of the lessons that were prepared for distance learning students, as well as extra mini videos on some topics.

You should read an exam question carefully. Many students answered generically,  meaning your answer could have been about any organisation, or was some kind of definition. At masters level we are looking for analysis, that you read and understood the case study, and can apply the strategic management theory to understand how the organisation can be improved.

Your level of English may also be a factor in a poor grade from the exam. You cannot say “my English is not very good”. It is your responsibility to improve your English so that study at Masters level is a possibility.

Before asking your lecturer for a higher grade, think about how the lecturer calculated your grade. Even one blank answer can result in a much lower grade. The lecturer has a marking scheme when they mark exams, they are looking for certain items to be on the paper before giving marks. You don’t get lots of marks simply because you wrote a lot. Being unhappy with your grade is not a legitimate reason for asking for a grade change. Needing a higher CGPA is not a reason for badgering an individual lecturer for a higher grade.  Lecturers can only mark what is in front of them. They can’t give you marks just because they like you.

Yes, it is your student right to be able to “see” your mid term paper. It is not your right to argue with a lecturer and insist that your answers are correct and you should get a higher mark.

Please bear these comments in mind in regards to your exam performance.

 

Feedback on Mid Term Exam

Your grade is now available in your portal.

In general, the exam was poorly answered. Students simply repeated sections of the case study, or answered in a generic way. The answers were very poor considering you were given many examples and a good idea of the type of question that would come up.

This is a masters level class in strategic management. It is essential that students show “analysis”. Theory would have been covered at undergraduate level. It is important to show that you can use that knowledge and apply theory to real life case studies.

In Detail

Q1. Core Competency

This is simply what the company is good at.

The resources and skills that distinguish an organisation.

Q2. Sustainable Competitive Advantage

The qualities or attributes which are different from other competitors in the market, that make it special.

Q3, Corporate Social responsibility

Some self-regulating rules that show a company is socially accountable, in many areas from looking after its customers, staff, to looking after the environment.

In the “tea” cast study, there was no information on this. You should have said it is not possible to determine.

Q4. SWOT

Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats

This was extremely poorly completed, or even blank in many cases.

Q5. Alternative strategies

You were asked to “create NEW strategies”, but many students tried to fill in the section with the organisation’s current strategies.

Also – many students just gave definitions, eg. Forward integration is…..

Q6. Market Development

This question, about global expansion, was quite well done.

 

 

Analysing a Case Study

Today’s class will involve developing your skills in answering case studies.

Here is the case study we will use:

Case Study:  Innocent Drinks

Innocent Drinks is a company that makes smoothies, juice and veg pots, sold in supermarkets, coffee shops and various other outlets. The company sells over two million smoothies per week. Innocent is over 90% owned by The Coca Cola Company. Innocent was founded by three Cambridge University graduates: Richard Reed, Adam Balon and Jon Wright, then working in consulting and advertising. In 1999, after spending six months working on smoothie recipes and £500 on fruit, the trio sold their drinks from a stall at a music festival in London. People were asked to put their empty bottles in a ‘yes’ or ‘no’ bin depending on whether they thought the three should quit their jobs to make smoothies. At the end of the festival the ‘YES’ bin was full, with only three cups in the ‘NO’ bin, so they went to their work the next day and resigned. After quitting their jobs, the three struggled to find investment, but eventually had a lucky break when Maurice Pinto, a wealthy American businessman, decided to invest £250,000. In total, it took fifteen months from the initial idea to taking the product to market.

 

Revenue for the company declined in 2008 as a result of the global financial crisis which led to an overall loss of £8.6m. On 6 April 2009, Innocent Drinks announced on its website an agreement to sell a stake of 10-20% to The Cocal Cola Company, with the three founders retaining operational control for £30 million. As a result of the takeover Ethical Consumer magazine reduced their ethical rating for the company. In April 2010, Coca-Cola increased its stake in the company to 58% from 18% for about £65 million. In February 2013 Coca-Cola increased their stake to over 90%, leaving the three founders with a small minority holding. Innocent say their brand identity is nothing less than their entire business, everything from the products to the adverts, how they answer the “banana phone” to the way they interact with customers.

 

Smoothies are Innocent’s primary product. The Innocent smoothie consists of whole crushed fruit and juices, but other ingredients such as carrots and ginger have been used in some drinks. Innocent also makes smoothies, fruit tubes and juice for kids; a not-from-concentrate juice range; and noodle pots and veg pots, a range of ready meals. Innocent launched a new range of ‘super smoothies’ in March 2014.

 

Innocent gives 10% of its profits to charity, the majority of which goes to the Innocent foundation, a UK registered charity set up in 2004. The Innocent foundation’s aim is to help the world’s hungry by providing grants to charities and projects helping communities on a sustainable path to a better life where they can escape poverty and hunger. The Innocent foundation provides funding for four different types of project to help the world’s hungry: seed funding, local food poverty, breakthrough development and emergency relief. Since the foundation was set up it has given over £2.4m to 55 projects, helping reach over 530,000 people

Innocent say “We want our packaging to have the lowest possible impact on the world around us.

Our starting point is to understand the carbon impact of all our various packaging components.

Our toolkit for reducing carbon looks a little like this:
• Use less: as little material as possible per pack
• Don’t use up new stuff: as much recycled or renewable material as possible
• Close the loop: materials and pack formats that are easy to recycle
• Lower its impact: deliberately avoiding high carbon materials”

What is the core competency of this organisation?

What is the sustainable competitive advantage of this organisation?

Is this a socially responsible organisation, and why?

Create a SWOT ANALYSIS for the organisation.

Based on your understanding of the Case Study, create new strategies for the organisation, using the strategy types below.

  • Forward integration
  • Backward integration
  • Market Penetration
  • Market Development
  • Product Development
  • Related Diversification
  • Horizontal integration

Which alternative strategies do you believe are the best choice for this organisation, and why?

Comment on the suitability of this product for expansion globally.

 

[innocent drinks case study]

Eating Seaweed around the world

Being Welsh, I knew that in Wales people eat lavabread (seaweed and oats) for breakfast. Here’s a video of a food hut in West Wales where they make food from seaweed.

 

 

Seaweed is also collected and cooked in France.

 

 

One seaweed, agar agar, has always been used instead of gelatine to make a jelly.

another thickening agent is Irish Moss

 

In New Zealand, the Maori people used Seaweed as bags to preserve food.

 

But probably the most famous users of seaweed are the Japanese.

 

Happy eating 🙂